Vitamin D

Posted in H1N1, Health, medical, swine flu, vaccines, vitamin d3 with tags , , , , , on October 24, 2009 by Asheville Prepper

Vitamin D

Read each page linked below starting with the Wikipedia links you will be surprised at some of the research.

While the links below are leaning more on the flu and influenza side, Vitamin D deficiency may also be linked to an increased susceptibility to several chronic diseases, such as high blood pressure, tuberculosis, cancer, periodontal disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, seasonal affective disorder, peripheral artery disease, cognitive impairment which includes memory loss and foggy brain, and several autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes,  Parkinson’s disease, Rickets, Osteomalacia, and Osteoporosis

Immunomodulation
Active vitamin D hormone also increases the production of cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide that is produced in macrophages triggered by bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Vitamin D deficiency tends to increase the risk of infections, such as influenza and tuberculosis. In a 1997 study, Ethiopian children with rickets were 13 times more likely to get pneumonia than children without rickets.  Vitamin D may also have therapeutic clinical applications in the treatment of inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis), dermatological conditions (psoriasis, actinic keratosis), osteoporosis, cancers (prostate, colon, breast, myelodysplasia, leukemia, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma), and autoimmune diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, type I diabetes); central nervous systems diseases (multiple sclerosis); and in preventing organ transplant rejection.

Cancer prevention and recovery
The vitamin D hormone, calcitriol, has been found to induce death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The anti-cancer activity of vitamin D is thought to result from its role as a nuclear transcription factor that regulates cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and a wide range of cellular mechanisms central to the development of cancer. These effects may be mediated through vitamin D receptors expressed in cancer cells.

Vitamin D From Wikipedia

Vitamin D and influenza From Wikipedia

One Hour FREE Vitamin D Lecture to Clear Up All Your Confusion on this Vital Nutrient
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/12/16/my-one-hour-vitamin-d-lecture-to-clear-up-all-your-confusion-on-this-vital-nutrient.aspx

Avoid Flu Shots With the One Vitamin that Will Stop Flu in Its Tracks
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/10/21/avoid-flu-shots-vitamin-d-is-a-better-way.aspx

More Evidence Vitamin D Beats the Flu
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2006/10/03/more-evidence-vitamin-d-beats-the-flu.aspx

Avoid Flu Shots, Take Vitamin D Instead
http://lewrockwell.com/miller/miller27.html

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Vitamin D Resource Page
http://www.mercola.com/article/vitamin-d-resources.htm
==============

Sixty million years of evolution says vitamin D may save your life from swine flu
http://www.naturalnews.com/027231_Vitamin_D_immune_system_vaccines.html

Vitamin D news and articles
http://www.naturalnews.com/Vitamin_D.html

Despite Anti-Vitamin D Bias, CDC Stumbles on Deficiency Link to H1N1 Deaths
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/09/22/Low-Vitamin-D-Increases-Flu-Death-Risk-in-Kids.aspx

Test Values and Treatment for Vitamin D Deficiency
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2002/02/23/vitamin-d-deficiency-part-one.aspx

Canada Looks at Vitamin D for Swine Flu Protection
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/08/27/Canada-Looks-at-Vitamin-D-for-Swine-Flu-Protection.aspx

Rickets (Vitamin D Deficiency) Cases Rising
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2000/08/27/vitamin-d-rickets.aspx

The Depressing Truth About Vitamin D Deficiency
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2006/12/30/the-depressing-truth-about-vitamin-d-deficiency.aspx

UV Exposure Only Way To Get Adequate Vitamin D
http://www.rense.com/general82/uv.htm

Discover the Pain of Vitamin D Deficiency
http://www.naturalnews.com/026966_Vitamin_D_vitamin_D_deficiency_chronic_pain.html

Urgent: What to Do If You Cannot Avoid Flu Shots or are Exposed to Virus Shedding
http://www.naturalnews.com/027106_vaccination_Vitamin_D_vaccinations.html

Valuable Insights Into the Importance of Vitamin D and Sun
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/04/03/vitamin-d-grant.aspx

How Sunshine and Vitamin D Can Help You Eliminate Mercury
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/12/04/how-sunshine-and-vitamin-d-can-help-you-eliminate-mercury.aspx

Vitamin D and H1N1 Swine Flu
http://www.start-up.co.nz/vitamin-d-and-h1n1-swine-flu/

Epidemic Influenza And Vitamin D
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/51913.php

Researchers see link between vitamin D, flu immunity
http://www.jsonline.com/features/health/44680902.html
http://media.journalinteractive.com/images/fluvitaminG_051109.jpg

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Purify Water

Posted in Uncategorized on October 24, 2009 by paprepper

Purify Water

I figured that this was the one thing that would probably do the most good

REMEMBER – when using liquid bleach to purify water, the formulas all are counting on bleach to be about 5-7% strength…which after 6 months of shelf storage is no longer a sure thing with liquid bleach. Storing liquid bleach long term isn’t effective, as it will loose its effectiveness after 3-6 months link

Storing granular calcium hypochlorite (pool shock) is cheap and easy and the shelf life is much longer.

30 bucks of the right sort of pool shock would probably purify a lifetimes worth of drinking water for several people in ideal conditions. I first read about this on SF and didn’t figure this out all on my own but I did do the research with help from SF and refined things to this point:

Here is what I found: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/emerg.html

Pay attention to the section on granular calcium hypochlorite to disinfect water. Read the whole thing as it paints a big picture to understand but I really liked the idea of being able to treat a lot of water, for just a couple bucks.

Granular calcium hypochlorite is available from Leslie’s pool supply in 73% strength with a minimum average yield of 70% chlorine – perfect for what we need. (see pic for example of product) Its sold as common everyday Pool Shock.

Read the label of the pool shock closely! All you want to use for this is high concentration of Granular Calcium Hypochlorite and nothing else. Be careful to avoid the multi-function pool shocks that have chemicals like algicides and other ‘multi function 4-in-1’ products. All you want is Calcium Hypochlorite at 65% or stronger. Don’t worry about the ingredients listed as ‘other’ those are the inert parts to keep the concentrations down to where they want them. So long as no other chemical is specifically listed then its OK.

Materials needed (maybe 10 bucks worth of stuff):
1 bag of Leslie’s 73% Calcium Hypochlorite Pool Shock ($4)
a couple 5 gallon buckets ($0 – $5 depending on how you get them)
a funnel ($1)
a couple empty bleach containers ($0 save them as you use them normally)

Step 1: Make bleach
1 heaping teaspoon of pool shock makes 2 gallons of bleach
– place 2 gallons of water into a 5 gallon bucket
– place 1 heaping *teaspoon* of pool shock into bucket
– stir into solution thoroughly
– place funnel into empty 1 gallon bleach container
– pour 1 gallon out of bucket into bleach container
– repeat for other bleach container

Now you have made two gallons of normal household bleach that you can use for anything you would normally use bleach for like cleaning, disinfecting etc.

Step 2: Use bleach to disinfect water
– 2.5 *tablespoons* of bleach solution goes into 1 gallon of water for disinfecting
– stir into solution and wait 30 mins
– sample taste the disinfected water, if it tastes too strong of chlorine then aerate the water by simply pouring 1 gallon from one container into another a couple times and this will help remove the objectionable taste, if any.

Kid Tests New Taser On Himself Video

Posted in Uncategorized on October 23, 2009 by Asheville Prepper

Please dont do this!!!

AR Machined Lower

Posted in Gun Deals, guns & ammo with tags on October 23, 2009 by Asheville Prepper

AR Machined Lower

It’s machined from aluminum, not forged or cast. Probably going to be a bit heavier, but also sturdier and more durable. By TNW Firearms of Vernonia, Oregon.

Price: $79.99

Kel-Tec PF-9 Review

Posted in guns & ammo with tags on October 23, 2009 by Asheville Prepper

Kel-Tec PF-9 Review at The Firearm Blog

ONE MONTH IN A BOX

Posted in food, Food Storage, Survival Gear with tags , , , , on October 23, 2009 by paprepper

ONE MONTH IN A BOX

by Robert Waldrop

One 20 quart size powdered milk (4 pounds)

One 10 lb bag rice

Two 4 lb bags beans

Two 3 lb bags of macaroni

Three 13 ounce quick oats

Two 5 lb bags flour

One 8 ounce baking cocoa

One 4 lb bag of sugar

One 10 oz baking powder

One 8 oz baking soda

One 4 lb jar of peanut butter

One 1 qt bottle of syrup

30 miscellaneous cans (soups, vegetables, chili, etc.)

One bottle hot sauce

One bottle soy sauce

9 miscellaneous spice bottles

2 vitamin bottles

One 4 ounce bottle of vanilla extract

One 4 ounce bottle of yeast

One 16 oz bottle of jalapeno peppers

One copy Better Times Cookbook and Almanac of Useful Information for Poor People
I found a 23 inches by 21 inches by 10 inches computer box, and all of above food fit into the box, with the lid folding flat and would fit underneath a bed or table. .

The above would provide the following daily servings: (for one person)

2-1/2 cups milk

1-1/2 cups cooked rice

1-1/2 cups cooked beans

1-1/2 cups cooked macaroni

1 cup cooked oats

1 cup flour

4 Tbs. peanut butter

1 miscellaneous can of food Plus daily sugar and spice
I am not in the business of giving nutritional advice, but it seems that if a half gallon or so of cooking oil, another can per day and a serving of fruit juice (equivalent of another can) are added, which wouldn’t fit in this space, you’d be all right for a month. Depending on the assortment of cans, a variety of stuff can be made from these ingredients, including cinnamon rolls, oatmeal cookies, peanut butter cookies, tuna casserole, etc.

CONCENTRATED FOODS

Posted in food, Food Storage, survival, Survival Gear, wild foods, Wilderness Survival with tags , , on October 23, 2009 by Asheville Prepper

CONCENTRATED FOODS

The fiirst European settlers in this country were ignorant of the ways of the wilderness. Some of them had been old campaigners in civilized lands, but they did not know the resources of American forests, nor how to utilize them. The consequence was that many starved in a land of plenty. The survivois learned to pocket their pride and learn from the natives, who, however contemptible they might seem in other respects, were past masters of the art of going “light but right.” An almost naked savage could start out alone and cross from the Atlantic to the Mississippi, without buying or begging from anybody, and without robbing, unless from other motives than hunger. This was not merely due to the abundance of game. There were large tracts of the wilderness where game was scarce, or where it was unsafe to hunt. The Indian knew the edible plants of the forest, and how to extract good food from roots that were rank or poisonous in their natural state; but he could not depend wholly upon such fortuitous findings. His mainstay on long journeys was a small bag of parched and pulverised maize, a spoonful of which, stirred in water, and swallowed at a draught, sufficed him for a meal when nature’s storehouse failed.

Pinole.—All of our early chroniclers praised this parched meal as the most nourishing food known. In New England it went by the name of “nocake,” a corruption of tlie Indian word nookik. William Wood, who, in 1634, wrote the first topographical account of tlie Massachusetts colony, says of nocake that ”It is Indian corn parched in the hot ashes, the ashes being sifted from it; it is afterwards beaten to powder and put into a long leatherne bag trussed at the Indian’s backe like a knapsacke, out of which they take three spoonsful a day.” Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, said that a spoonful of nocake mixed with water made him “many a good meal.” Roger did not affirm, however, that it. made him a square meal, nor did he mention the size of his spoon.

In Virginia this preparation was knowm by another Indian name, “rockahominy” (which is not, as our dictionaries assume, a synonym for plain hominy, but a quite different thing). That most entertaining of our early woodcraftsmen, Colonel Byrd of Westover, wlio ran tlie dividing line between Virginia and North Carolina in 1728-29, speaks of it as follows:

“Rockaliominy is nothing’ but Indian corn parched without burning-, and reduced to Powder. The Fire drives out all tlie Watery Parts of tlie Corn, leaving the Strength of it behind, and this being very dry, becomes much lighter for carriage and Iess liable to be Spoilt by the Moist Air. Thus half a Dozen Pounds of this Sprightful Bread will sustain a Man for as many Months, provided he husband it well, and always spare it when he meets with Venison, which, as I said before, may be Safely eaten without any Bread at all. By what I have said a Man needs not encumber himself with more than 8 or 10 Pounds of Provision, tho’ he continue half a year in the Woods. These and his Gun will support him very well during the time, without the least danger of keeping one Single Fast.”

The Moravian missionary Heckewelder, in his History, Manners and Customs of the Indian Nations, describes how the Lenni Lenape, or Delawares, prepared and used this emergency food:

“Their Psindamooan or Tassmanane, as they call it, is the most nourishing- and durable food made out of the Indian corn. The blue sweetish kind is the grain which they prefer for that purpose. They parch it in clean hot ashes., until it bursts, it is then sifted and cleaned, and pounded in a mortar into a kind of flour, and when they wish to make it very good, they mix some sugar [i.e., maple sugar] with it. When wanted for use, they take about a tablespoonful of this flour in their mouths, then stooping to the river or brook, drink water to it. If, however, they have a cup or other small vessel at hand, they put the flour in it and mix it with water, in the proportion of one tablespoonful to a pint. At their camps they will put a small quantity in a kettle with water and let it boil down, and they will have a thick pottage. With this food the traveler and warrior will set out on long journeys and expeditions, and as a little of it will serve them for a day, they have not a heavy load of provisions to carry. Persons who are unacquainted with this diet ought to be careful not to take too much at a time, and not to suffer themselves to be tempted too far by its flavor; more than one or two spoonfuls, at most, at any one time or at one meal is dangerous; for it is apt to swell in the stomach or bowels, as when heated over a fire.”

The best of our border hunters and warriors, such as Boone and Kenton and Crockett, relied a good deal upon this Indian dietary when starting on their long hunts, or when undertaking forced marches more formidable than any that regular troops could have withstood. So did Lewis and Clark on tlieir ever-memorable expedition across the unknown West. Modern explorers who do their outfitting in London or New York, and who think it needful to command a small army of porters and gun-bearers when they go into savage lands, might do worse than read the simple annals of that trip by Lewis and Clark, if they care to learn what real pioneering was.

It is to be understood, of course, that the parched and pulverized maize was used mainly or solely as an emergency food, when no meat was to te had. Ordinarily the hunters of tliat day, white and red, when they were away from settlements or trading posts, lived on “meat straight,” helped out with nuts, roots, wild salads, and berries. Thus did Boone, the greater part of two years, on his first expedition to Kentucky; and so did the trappers of the far West in tlie days of Jim Bridger and Kit Carson.

Powdered parched corn is still the standby of native travelers in the wilds of Spanish America, and it is sometimes used by those hardy mountaineers, “our contemporary ancestors,” in the Southern Appalachians. One of my camp-mates in the Great Smoky Mountains expressed to me his surprise that any one should be ignorant of so valuable a resource of the hunter’s life. He claimed that no other food was so “good for a man’s wind” in mountain climbing.

In some parts of the South and West the pulverized parched corn is called “coal flour.” The Indians of Louisiana gave it the name of gofio. In Mexico it is known as pinole. (Spanish pronunciation, pee-nolay; English, pie-no-lee.)

Some years ago Mr. T. S. Van Dyke, author of The Still Hunter and other excellent works on field sports, published a very practical article on emergency rations in a weekly paper, from which, as it is now buried where few can consult it, I take the liberty of making the following quotation:

“La comida del desierto, the food of the desert, or pinole, as it is generally called, knocks the hind sights off all American condensed foods. It is the only form in which you can carry an equal weight and bulk of nutriment on which alone one can, if necessary, live continuously for weeks, and even months, without any disorder of stomach or bowels. . . . The principle of pinole is very simple. If you should eat a breakfast of corn-meal mush alone, and start out for a hard tramp, you will feel hungry in an hour or two, though at the table the dewrinkling of your abdomen may have reached the hurting point. But if, instead of distending the meal so much with water and heat, you had simply mixed it in cold water and drunk it, you could have taken down three times the quantity in one-tenth of the time. You would not feel the difference at your waistband, but you would feel it mightily in your legs, especially if you have a heavy rifle on your back. It works a little on the principle of dried apples, though it is quite an improvement. There is no danger of explosion; it swells to suit the demand, and not too suddenly.

Suppose, now, instead of raw corn-meal, we make it not only drinkable but positively good. This is easily done by parching to a very light brown before grinding, and grinding just fine enough to mix so as to be drinkable, but not pasty, as flour would be. Good wheat is as good as corn, and perhaps better, while the mixture is very good. Common rolled oats browned in a pan in the oven and run through a spice mill is as good and easy to make it out of as anything. A coffee mill may do if it will set fine enough. Ten per cent. of popped corn ground in with it will improve the flavor so much that your children will get away with it all if you don’t hide it. Wheat and corn are hard to grind, but the small Enterprise spice mill will do it. You may also mixm somc ground chocolate with it for flavor, which, with popped corn, makes it very fine . . . Indigestible? Your granny’s nightcap! . . You must remember that it is “werry fillin’ for the price,” and go slow with it until you have found your coeflicient. . . .

Now for the application. The Mexican rover of the desert will tie a small sack of pinole behind his saddle and start for a trip of several days. It is the lightest of food, and in the most portable shape, sandproof, bug and fly proof, and everything. Whenever he finds water he stirs a few ounces in a cup (I never weighed it, but four seem about enough at a time for an ordinary man), drinks it in five seconds, and is fed for five or six hours. If he has jerky, he chews that as he jogs along, but if he has not he will go through the longest trip and come out strong and well on pinole alone.”

—Shooting and Fishing, Vol. xx, p. 248